An interview with AnaTaban: an artists’ collective trying to bring peace to South Sudan

An interview with AnaTaban: an artists’ collective trying to bring peace to South Sudan
As South Sudan was descending again into civil war, a group of young artists came together and launched the AnaTaban initiative. In a country where 70% of the population are under 25 years old, AnaTaban uses arts to convey a message of peace and reconciliation to mobilize the youth to build a better future. Read More

What you need to know about the Iraqi Kurdish referendum, one month on

What you need to know about the Iraqi Kurdish referendum, one month on
A controversial independence referendum was held last month in several provinces of Northern Iraq. The vote started a sequence of spiraling domestic and regional tensions. A month on, here is what you need to know. Read More

When the most vulnerable support the most persecuted

When the most vulnerable support the most persecuted
Bangladesh, one of the most vulnerable countries in the world, is currently home to more than half a million of the world’s most persecuted people: the Rohingya. Read More

A right to education. Can South Sudanese children defy the odds to get an education?

A right to education. Can South Sudanese children defy the odds to get an education?
In a country where 70% of the population is under 25 year-old, four years of civil war has jeopardized an entire generation. Today, 4.6 million South Sudanese children need humanitarian assistance, 2 million have been displaced and 17,000 have been recruited into armed groups. Amid this chaotic situation, many children have had their right to education denied, shattering their dreams to build a better future for themselves. Read More

“Education is the best thing in life” | Back to School: Addressing the challenges faced by Iraqi and Syrian children

“Education is the best thing in life” | Back to School: Addressing the challenges faced by Iraqi and Syrian children
Syrian and Iraqi children have been witness to war when they should have been going to school. In the first of this two-part series, iguacu explored the deep psychological impact the wars are having on an entire generation. This blog will delve into the challenges of humanitarian response, and review some of the initiatives that address the children’s traumas and help them get back to school. Read More

From peacekeeper to peacemaker? Who can fill the boots of the UN peacekeepers?

From peacekeeper to peacemaker? Who can fill the boots of the UN peacekeepers?
After the Central African Republic descended into civil war, a UN operation, MINUSCA, was launched in 2014 to restore stability in the country. In the third of a three part series, Blandine Sixdenier, looks at the possible solutions to curb spiralling violence in the Central African Republic. Read More

93% Iraqi Kurds just voted in favour of an independent state. But who are the Kurds?

93% Iraqi Kurds just voted in favour of an independent state. But who are the Kurds?
A controversial referendum was held on Monday in several provinces of northern Iraq. Voters cast their ballots in favor of, or against the creation of an independent Kurdish state in this region. According to the first results, nearly 93% of voters have voted for independence. Here is what you need to know about the Kurdish people. Read More

Beyond their years… How Afghanistan’s youth are filling the social welfare void

Beyond their years… How Afghanistan’s youth are filling the social welfare void
Today, more than 42% of the population live below the poverty line in Afghanistan. With the social welfare system being an unfamiliar phenomenon, some Afghan families depend on informal social groups and the traditional family structure to get by. Read More

“In my dreams, I go back to my home village and see ghosts of my friends” | The impact of war trauma on Syrian and Iraqi children

“In my dreams, I go back to my home village and see ghosts of my friends” | The impact of war trauma on Syrian and Iraqi children
Syrian and Iraqi children have been caught up in a war-zone when they should have been going to school. In this two part series, Nathanael Chouraqui, Lead Researcher at iguacu, explores some of their stories, and the existing initiatives that address their traumas to help get them back to school. Read More

From peacekeeper to peacemaker? The UN mission at work in one of Africa’s most dangerous places.

From peacekeeper to peacemaker? The UN mission at work in one of Africa’s most dangerous places.
There have been over 20 United Nations (UN) peacekeeping operations in Africa since 1960. In the second of a three part series, Blandine Sixdenier, looks at the challenges and successes of one of the UN’s most recent deployments, in the Central African Republic (CAR), one of the world’s poorest strife-ridden countries. Read More

Where do we go from here... What you need to know about the ceasefires and de-escalation zones in Syria

Where do we go from here... What you need to know about the ceasefires and de-escalation zones in Syria
Ceasefires and so-called “de-escalation agreements” have been welcomed with a mix of relief, scepticism, and concern in Syria. Nathanael Chouraqui, iguacu’s Lead Researcher on Syria and Iraq, reviews some of the questions raised by these internationally brokered deals. Read More

From peacekeeper to peacemaker? Understanding the role of the United Nations in CAR

From peacekeeper to peacemaker? Understanding the role of the United Nations in CAR
The United Nations (UN) launched its first peacekeeping mission in Africa in 1960. Since then, over 20 operations have been authorized throughout the African continent. The UN operation in the Central African Republic (CAR) represents one of the last threads of security for many Central Africans as officials warn of genocide. Blandine Sixdenier, in a 3 part series, takes a closer look at the UN’s role in keeping the peace in one of Africa’s most dangerous countries. Read More

90 Second Update: 4 Reasons Why Myanmar's Peace Process Needs To Change

90 Second Update: 4 Reasons Why Myanmar's Peace Process Needs To Change
Peace has not come easily in Myanmar's recent history. In 1947, shortly before independence was declared, General Aung Sun lead fruitful but short lived peace negotiations in Panglong. The leaders of Myanmar’s ethnic armed groups signed the agreement, but following the assassination of General Aung Sun shortly after independence, the peace process fell apart. 70 years on, the daughter of General Aung Sun, and now leader of Myanmar, Aung San Suu Kyi, has set about the unenviable task of attempting to again establish peace. Read More

Love thy neighbor: how Uganda, Sudan and Ethiopia have responded to South Sudan’s refugee crisis

Love thy neighbor: how Uganda, Sudan and Ethiopia have responded to South Sudan’s refugee crisis
South Sudan’s civil war has caused the largest refugee crisis in Africa since the 1994 Rwandan genocide. Almost 2 million people were forced to flee their homes, more than half being children, to find refuge in neighboring countries. Uganda, Sudan and Ethiopia, have been the most common destinations for refugees, but each country has responded very differently to the influx of South Sudanese. Read More

The fall of Mosul: Mosul is 'liberated' but the humanitarian crises continues in Iraq

The fall of Mosul: Mosul is 'liberated' but the humanitarian crises continues in Iraq
The Iraqi Prime Minister, Haider al-Abadi, arrived in Mosul on Sunday, 9th July 2017, and declared the city liberated from the so-called Islamic state (IS). Read More

"In your own home, you don't feel homesick": the untimely return of Afghan refugees

"In your own home, you don't feel homesick": the untimely return of Afghan refugees
Since the beginning of 2016, waves of Afghans have returned from neighbouring Pakistan and Iran, where some have lived for decades. According to the International Organization for Migration (IOM), and the United Nations High Commissions for Refugees (UNHCR), the number of returnees from Pakistan peaked in the summer of 2016, as living conditions in Pakistan have worsened. Following years of conflict, the coping capacities of Afghanistan are being severely tested by influx of individuals and families from Pakistan and Iran. iguacu’s Lead Researcher for Afghanistan, Rahila Muhibi, interviewed a number of returnees to shed light on this largely unknown issue. Read More

Famine…what famine? What you need to know about the ongoing food crisis in South Sudan

Famine…what famine? What you need to know about the ongoing food crisis in South Sudan
On the 20th February 2017, famine was declared in two counties of the Unity State in central South Sudan. This was the first time a famine had been declared globally since 2011, and was brought on as a result of the country’s ongoing conflict, and to a lesser extent drought. Over 100,000 people faced starvation and a further one million were at risk of starvation. Read More

Haiti, between the hammer and the anvil

Haiti, between the hammer and the anvil
In October 2016, Hurricane Matthew struck Haiti and caused the worst humanitarian crisis there since the 2010 earthquake. More than two million people were affected by the latest disaster to hit the Caribbean Island and up to 1,000 were killed. Homes, schools and hospitals were seriously damaged or destroyed. Read More

The who's who in the Central African Republic

The who's who in the Central African Republic
The first quarter of 2017 was marked by renewed violence in the Central African Republic (CAR). In 2013, the country descended into civil war after the Séléka coalition ousted president Bozizé. Today, more than 14 armed groups control over 60% of the territory, and nearly half of the population is in need of humanitarian assistance. Read More

"A for Apple, B for Bomb": when a child attends a school controlled by Islamic State

"A for Apple, B for Bomb": when a child attends a school controlled by Islamic State
For Iraqi children living in areas controlled by the so-called Islamic State (IS), violence is ever present. From the youngest age, children are witnesses to and often victims of IS’s brutal repression. Schools are no safe haven. Read More
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